19 February 2012

English Pudding

Most Saturday mornings at my house begin with a hot bowl of English pudding for breakfast. My mom used to make this for me and my brothers and we always loved mixing in our favorite ingredients. My childhood favorite was frozen raspberries; they begin thawing immediately in the hot pudding and leave streaks of color as you stir them.  I'm also a big fan of banana slices.
It takes ten to fifteen minutes to make, and you'll feel mighty fancy starting off your day by tempering something.  Let's get started!
Ingredients (2 servings)
  • 1 C. milk
  • 1/4 C. granulated sugar
  • 3 T. flour
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 egg
  • 1 T. butter
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • Fresh or frozen fruit 
First, put the milk in a microwaveable bowl and heat for about 5 minutes. In the meantime, mix the eggs, flour, sugar, and salt together in a small bowl with a wire wisk.
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Now for the tempering!  The goal is to combine the egg mixture and hot milk without making scrambled eggs. Begin by pouring a little of the hot milk into the egg mixture while simultaneously stirring.  Add a little more milk--I probably end up adding 1/2 cup of hot milk to the egg mixture in total.
Now that the egg mixture has been "warmed up" a little, you can go ahead and incorporate it into the big milk bowl.  Just make sure you are stirring the milk as you pour the egg mixture in. 
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Put the big bowl back in the microwave and cook in 30 second intervals, stirring the pudding in between intervals. Make sure to scrape the sides of the bowl since that is usually where it starts to thicken first.
Once the pudding is thickened, add the butter and vanilla extract and stir well.
Divide among bowls and serve with your toppings! Easy peasy!

4 comments:

  1. So neat, I'm excited to try this. Might be a good change from our usual hot cereal and smoothie.

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  2. Yum, yum, YUM! I am puddin' this on my must do list!

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  3. This post brings back memories of my childhood! On our small WV farm, we would often on Saturday evenings have for supper what my mom and dad called "Thickened Milk." They thought it could only be made with milk straight from the barn---of which we had plenty. I remember my mom making the little dish of egg and flour and then heating the milk on the stove. Of course, no microwaves back then. Hers had no sugar or vanilla, but we ate it on a plate with a big pat of home-churned butter and lots of brown sugar. It was my favorite Saturday night supper! I am definitely going to try your more modern version!

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  4. You made me giggle when I spotted 'English Pudding'. What is this I thought? I'm English - so what could English Pudding possibly be? It's good old-fashioned custard! Not many people make it like this any more,they will either buy ready-made in a carton or make a quick version with custard powder - which is simply flavoured cornflour (I'm not sure what this is called in the US, but it is a very fine flour used for thickening sauces). I don't think an egg passed within 20 paces of either. When I was growing up, Mum would regularly make banana custard and you are simply not allowed to eat fruit pie in my house without a generous collop of custard on the top. Well done for making it the old-fashioned way - great for the kids!

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